Yet another sakura season comes and goes too quickly

25 May

Sakura, cherry blossoms, do not appear gradually on the trees. Rather they seem to burst out of their tiny cases one spring day when the sun hits them in just the right way.

Classic elegance in Tezukayama, south Osaka.

Classic elegance in Tezukayama, south Osaka.

The predictions on when they will blossom to their fullest are broadcast on the nightly news. I picture Japanese people peeking out their windows, waiting for the puffs of white and pink to appear. When the moment is right, and the day is warm, they emerge from their houses to celebrate the coming of spring.

The ubiquitous “leisure mats”, what we call tarps in Canada, are spread under any suitable spot under the large trees. Or, if for a child, a colourful Anpanman mat. Or newspapers for old men from another era.

Why get married during any other time of the year?

Why get married during any other time of the year?

Elaborate bento lunches; sakura mochi coloured pink, white and green; and numerous mixtures of alcohol are shared with the special people in your life or complete strangers. It’s the most celebrated time of the year. A time that is waited for all winter.

And then just days after they appear at their most glorious, the sakura fall. Covering the ground, swirling around ponds and down streams. Finding themselves in your limited edition sakura-flavoured tea.

A tunnel of sakura in Tezukayama.

A tunnel of sakura in Tezukayama.

And now it’s May, nearly June, and sakura season seems like many seasons ago.

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